Cuppa 1800’s tea?

Mom insisted that we had to do something cultural. We simply HAD to. But what educational things can you do in London when you only have 3 hours to spare? You simply can’t do museums and galleries any justice in that minimal amount of time. So we hopped on a train and headed down to Greenwich, on what was possibly the wettest day of my UK stay.

Masts and rigging always look so spectacular!

Masts and rigging always look so spectacular!

It's quite high up there, but mom is steering us true!

It’s quite high up there, but mom is steering us true (sort of…)!

 

The wet weather didn’t deter, however, and we really felt empathy for the poor sailors who would have had to deal with so much worse when they were aboard and sailing the Cutty Sark itself, in her hay day.

My brother isn't even very tall yet. The conditions must have been seriously cramped!

My brother isn’t even very tall yet. The conditions must have been seriously cramped!

 

She’s a recently refurbished old-school boat (tea clipper). She burnt down in the refurbishing process, and has recently been completed and opened up to the public again. She has an extensive history, that covers things from the tea and wool trade, coal delivery, and even served to educate new sailors. I couldn’t quite gather what made her so significant (apart from all that she’s been through), but I think this is also due to the fact that I am severely lacking in ship and nautical appreciation. I will work on that shortcoming soon.

The hull of the ship sits in a rather large hallway with a coffee shop at the back. It's incredible to think that there is a whole great big ship right above you. Then you think of the weight of it and how much cargo it used to carry and you suddenly feel very small and fragile.

The hull of the ship sits in a rather large hallway with a coffee shop at the back. It’s incredible to think that there is a whole great big ship right above you. Then you think of the weight of it and how much cargo it used to carry and you suddenly feel very small and fragile.

Things that stuck out for me was that she seemed rather fast. The museum housed in the ship itself really do a good job of demonstrating what it was like to sail the ship using a number of multimedia platforms. It’s an interactive and fun experience; they even had a ship sailing simulator to give an indication of how fast she sailed from eastern Australia to London.

In memoriam

 

It is an interesting visit even if you know nothing about anything to do with the ship, though some kind of knowledge of it’s existence would have helped us. Most people would have some motivation to visit it, though I think I was a bit unprepared. It’s definitely something nice to do in Greenwich that is a little less conventional than just visiting the Meridian (which, granted, is worth a visit as well).

Ship in a bottle (and the most hipster camera around)

Ship in a bottle (and the most hipster camera around)

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