Crumpety Flapjacks

Pancakes, crêpes, crumpets, flapjacks, drop scones?! Let’s get a few things straight here…
Crêpes are the pancakes we mean when we say “flat as a pancake”. They are beautifully wafer thin and roll up with fillings such as cinnamon and sugar, maybe some syrup, and possibly a squeeze of lemon juice for added zing. They are beyond easy to whip up (but just as easy to ruin, so be careful).
Crumpets are those fat discs of batter that people with (hole phobia) would be afraid of. They are best enjoyed by melting butter onto them, maybe with a squeeze of syrup.
Flapjacks, are like the typical American pancake – but smaller. Americans stack the bigger ones high and have them with bacon and syrup, or you can have them stuffed with blueberries or chocolate chips. I accept people calling these pancakes as much as I accept when people still consider deep dish pizza (as opposed to thin base) to be “pizza”. Some people just prefer a thicker pancake, and we call them flapjacks. Then you get those random people from who knows where that talk about drop scones. I know this can be confusing, as these have no scones in them at all. We’ll pretend this makes sense, those individuals are gradually fading out of society, so we’ll just let them stay in their alternate reality until they are no longer around to confuse people.
Then we have those who just need to acknowledge their wrongness. Those who think that chewy oat squares, what we call “Crunchies” in South Africa, are “flapjacks”. I’m sorry, but how now??? Please can someone explain how this biscuit is the same as a pancake in any which way? I am willing to accept defeat if there is some logical explanation behind this madness.
At the end of the day, however, they are all absolutely, completely, resolutely delicious, and the possibilities for making them even more exciting are endless. So whichever is your favourite, keep on loving the batter, and let me know which it is in the comments below.



  • ½ cup flour
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2ml baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • Approx. 125ml milk
  • 5ml melted butter


  1. Sift flour, salt and baking powder together
  2. Make a well in flour mixture with a wooden spoon, and add the egg
  3. Slowly work in enough milk to only wet the mixture. Tilt the bowl on its side and beat (slap) until there are no more lumps
  4. Melt the butter and add to the mixture
  5. Gradually add enough milk to form a pouring batter
  6. Heat pan to medium heat and spray with non-stick spray (or light coating of oil)
  7. Pour in spoonfuls at a time. When bubbles appear, turn over with a palette knife


Dairy… It’s a love hate relationship for me. I love it, it hates me. In fact, I think it love-hates me, and can’t actually make up its mind. Either way, I am of the moderately informed opinion that dairy isn’t really ideal for human consumption at all, but chances are, unless you are hugely intolerant/allergic to the stuff, you won’t really care about a little bit of discomfort for the sake of the dairy!

Mini milk tart
Take, for example, the classic South African Milktart: 71% milk (excluding the crust, which can be omitted for the grain/gluten-free). I could honestly eat the whole thing. And yes, I would over-dramatically hate my life afterwards, and yes, I will possibly go into some form of hyperglycemic shock (from the 12 teaspoons of sugar), and yes, I would insist on running 10km every day for the next month, to try work it off and make myself feel less guilty for the gluttony, but this little local tart can be so worth it… (I say this as if I haven’t eaten a whole milk tart by myself before… This is a judgment free space people!)
I’ve been on a quest to find a recipe that doesn’t involve either condensed milk or custard powder. This one fails in that quest, but succeeds in every other tasty way. Of course, my search will continue, and many milktarts will be quality tested on the way, so it can’t be all that bad.
Melk tert



  • 2 eggs
  • 10ml flour
  • 10ml custard powder
  • 20ml cornflour
  • 60ml sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 5ml vanilla essence
  • 565ml milk
  • 30g butter
  • 1 baked pastry case or biscuit crust
  • A little cinnamon


  1. Beat the eggs, then add the dry ingredients (flour, custard powder, cornflour, sugar and salt) and vanilla, and beat well
  2. Heat milk and butter until just boiling, then turn down to a slight simmer and gradually add the egg mixture, stirring constantly. Make sure not to let anything stick to the bottom of the pot.
  3. Cook, stirring continuously, until mixture thickens
  4. Pour mixture it a pie shell (biscuit crust or pre-baked), and sprinkle with cinnamon
  5. Leave to cool (or scald your tongue on the better version of warm homemade custard)

Courtney’s Gran’s Fudge

Nothing compares to a good fudge recipe – one that doesn’t crack and crumble and break your teeth, but also one that is so soft that it practically didn’t set. No, there has to be the perfect balance of stability and melt in your mouth softness. And this old family recipe gets that just right.
This is one of those “handwritten-in-pencil-and-covered-in-coffee-stains-and-who-knows-what-else-from-the-kitchen” recipes. I got it from my bestie’s grandmother’s recipe book. It was the treat she would bring to school for those of us who are lucky to be her friend. She doesn’t make me fudge anymore, but I am still blessed beyond measure that I still get to count her as one of my closest. I promise not all my relationships are based on whether or not you feed me. It is a factor though…
Courtney's Gran's fudge

Gran’s Fudge


  • 1 large can of condensed milk
  • 400g sugar
  • 35ml golden syrup
  • 75ml water
  • 60g butter
  • 5ml vanilla essence


  1. Put sugar and water into a heavy saucepan. Stir over low heat until dissolved
  2. Add butter and syrup, stir until melted
  3. Pour in the condensed milk and stir until boiling
  4. Simmer slowly for 20-25 minutes, stirring continuously
  5. Remove from stove and stir in the vanilla essence
  6. Pour into a greased pan. Leave to cool. Cut into squares

Healthified Millionaire’s “Shortbread”

These are so good that if I didn’t have my healthy blog, I would definitely pop them straight onto this blog. They are best served cold, and can be enjoyed as a “whenever you feel like chocolate” snack, or as an energy boosting bar that satisfies your sweet tooth when you are attempting to be healthy.


These are full of good fats (coconut oil, nuts, nut butter), which is both great, and deadly. The trick with healthy foods, is generally that moderation is still important. The high-protein, high-fat nature of these means they are very filling. Any more than one or two, and you’re definitely not enjoying them out of hunger, rather sheer enjoyment of the creamy, chocolatey, caramely goodness.

Check out the recipe here.

Frozen Coconut Ice – only 4 ingredients!

Do you want to build a snowman?
Or make a batch of icy treats?
I think some sugar here is overdue,
I’m talking to,
The banters who hate sweets!
Frozen Coconut Ice
Once upon a time we convinced ourselves that coconut was good for us, and that it fits perfectly into the low-carb:high-fat eating regime (which it kinda does, by the way). I have taken this useful information, and placed it in a far more practical application – the beauty and simplicity that is coconut ice. All your good fats, in one beautiful place.
Elsa Coconut Ice
And if you think there is too much sugar in this recipe (which there is, by the way), you can just Let It Go… Let it go, smile as you watch your tummy grow! Just kidding. Any treat can be enjoyed in moderation. In this case, moderation means one nibble per month, followed by at least a 21.1km half marathon.
Blue Coconut Ice
Totally worth it…
Frozen Coconut Ice
  • 1 can of condensed milk (400g)
  • 500g icing sugar
  • 400g desiccated coconut
  • Food colouring of choice – in the case of Frozen, you may want to use blue
  1. Mix the condensed milk, coconut and icing sugar together until well-combined and consistent throughout
  2. Divide the mixture in half and colour the one half to the desired colour
  3. Press the white half of the mixture into a lined pan, such as a brownie pan, and compress down
  4. Repeat with the other half for the second layer, ensuring it is smooth and even
  5. Can be enjoyed straight away, cut into squares or other desired shape, and it lasts well (which is great because it can get very sweet)

Peanut Butter Oat Cookies

I know it may sound like a cliche, but peanut butter is my life. Especially these days. I almost feel guilty because we now have the wonders of cashew nut and almond butter, but I just don’t think you can beat a good ol’ table spoon of peanut butter (or three). Granted, peanuts aren’t really touted as being as cool as the rest of the super foods, and they are nut-posers which means we shouldn’t really trust them. However, these legumes are so versatile and so affordable, that you can pretend they are as healthy as their bourgeois counterparts.
Peanut butter oatmeal cookies
I feel bad, as well, when I pack my boyfriend’s lunch for him each day (no judging – if I didn’t do this, he would live on 2-minute noodles and tinned tuna, his idea of a balanced meal), because I feel like there is no variety in his lunch, and basically every snack/meal contains peanut butter. Peanut butter smoothie, peanut butter sandwich, peanut butter-chocolate protein oats… Add these cookies to the mix, and I’m pretty sure he would turn into peanut butter. As if he wasn’t tasty enough…
Oatmeal peanut butter cookies
These soft yet crunchy cookies unfortunately don’t do much for encouraging a healthy diet, even though they have peanut butter as their base (mostly because of the sugar). Peanut butter, I believe, is a pretty controversial snack/ingredient. On the one hand, they are a natural source of healthy fats and protein, which helps keep you full, and helps to keep your bones and muscles healthy. On the other hand, eating a whole jar of deliciousness doesn’t really count as moderation. Most unfortunate.
Oatmeal peanut butter cookies
If you can manage the moderation, or if you at least have enough people to share these with that your portion is limited by default, then you should definitely give these a bake. If not, then just enjoy them because they peanut butter in its cookie form – as if you needed another way to enjoy peanut butter.
Peanut Butter Oatmeal Cookies
  • 200g wholewheat flour
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 125g butter
  • 200g brown sugar
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 100g rolled oats
  • 175g chunky peanut butter
  • 2 eggs


  1. Preheat oven to 180ºC and line your baking trays
  2. Cream the butter, sugar and cinnamon together until light and fluffy. Mix in the eggs and oats
  3. Sift the flour, baking powder and baking soda into the wet mixture and mix well
  4. Portion out the cookie dough onto your prepared pans, and flatten the dough balls
  5. Bake for 10-12 minutes until desired consistency. Slightly longer for a crispy cookie, slightly shorter for a more chewy cookie. Note that they will harden a bit once removed from the oven too
  6. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on a cooling rack

Quick Loaf

Summer is not merely upon us, rather, it is downright smothering us! This oppressive heat is… wonderful. I love it. Yay summer, yay shorts, and yay baking. Oh wait, not yay baking… It’s far too hot to have the oven on! That’s a real shame…

Quick loaf 1

I made this bread a while ago… Back when I was allowed to eat bread… While I am not meant to be eating bread at the moment, if I did actually make it again, I would definitely break my bread rule. I would just need to make sure I had someone to share it with, otherwise I would eat the whole thing! And that’s really not good for the whole “bikini body” thing everyone is on about…

Quick loaf 2


  • 400g white bread flour
  • 125g wholewheat flour
  • 2 tsp fine salt
  • 25g butter
  • 250ml warm water
  • 175g raw, grated potato
  • 2 tbsp malt vinegar
  • 5 tsp instant yeast
  • Oil for kneading


  1. Mix the flours and the salt together and rub the butter through the flour mixture
  2. Stir together the warm water, potato, vinegar and yeast, and then add to the flour mixture, using it to bring the dough together
  3. Leave the dough to rest for 10 minutes, then remove from the bowl onto an oiled surface for kneading. Knead well
  4. Return to the bowl and leave to prove for 20 minutes
  5. Remove from the bowl, shape (ball or traditional free-form oblong loaf shape), and place on a floured tray. Cover with a tea towel and leave to prove for 20-30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 220°C while waiting
  6. Dust the loaf with flour, slash it down the middle, and place into the oven, on the middle rack, for 40-50 minutes. You may want to include a bit of steam in the oven by filling a small metal roasting tin with boiling water, and placing it on the lowest shelf (personally I have found that I end up with a soggy bottom when I do this, so I’m not really a fan – the loaf works with and without this step)